Thursday, April 30, 2009

HANA


Hana, 2009, oil on linen, 22 x 20 in., 55.9 x 50.8 cm.

I did, in fact, finish this new smaller painting entitled Hana to accompany Devon's Back in the May 1st Grand Opening of Evoke Contemporary in Santa Fe, New Mexico. It's a portrait of Sena Inukai, Mari Inukai's daughter, at age 16 now. Growing up too fast!

EVOKE Contemporary
130 Lincoln Avenue, Suite F
Santa Fe, New Mexico 87501
505.995.9902
EvokeContemporary.com
info@evokecontemporary.com

14 comments:

  1. we almost cry..thank you KW!!

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  2. Kent, was this live modeling ? or with a previous sketch ?
    how do you choose your colors, randomly or with some fidelity to the model ?
    ( I missed this step in the Natalia painting process and I´m still curious )

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  3. beautiful piece! Funny, between your work and Mari's you can actually see her growing up.

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  4. would be incredible if you two got everything Sena in an artbook.

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  5. Stunning work! Amazing skin tones and so much life and emotion

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  6. Love the texture in this one, deep.

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  7. Hi Kent,

    This painting is amazing. I was on Twitter and someone posted about your new exhibition and I recognized your name since you were a teacher of mine back in 1988 at Pratt, my junior year. In fact I had to model for you once for a book cover. Its wonderful to see all your success!

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  8. Wow!! Amazing paint!!
    I love your work!!

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  9. As usual a wonderful sense of emotion! your work is very inspiring, thanks for sharing!
    i have a question: you said that with your painting "natalia" two weeks passes from begening to the end of the painting; how do you keep the work fresh and spontaneous with that lapse of time passing by?

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  10. Pablo: As far as color, I wouldn't say my choices are made at random, but I don't have the model in front of me at all times either. I sometimes make color notes during my drawing sessions, sometimes color studies as well. Of course, I employ my understanding of color and light, and a fair dose of imaginative play as well.

    Keul: Working in layers like I do, most of my paintings do in fact take multiple weeks to paint. I guess I'm able to keep it fresh because I manage to maintain genuine interest in my subject. Plus, though my paintings are not done quickly, my natural hand or brushwork has a spontaneous flavor, I suppose.

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